Beaufort, South Carolina Low Country

2014

 From northern NM high country to South Carolina tidal lowlands amounts to an 8,000’ transformation in elevation.

Water, water and more water, as the tidewater fishing fleet courses amongst the lowlands, always followed by wonderful skimming pelicans…

Low Country<br>Beaufort, South Carolina — 2014 Low Country II<br>Beaufort, South Carolina — 2014 Low Country III<br>Beaufort, South Carolina — 2014 Low Country IV<br>Beaufort, South Carolina — 2014 Low Country V<br>Beaufort, South Carolina — 2014 Low Country V<br>Beaufort, South Carolina — 2014

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Antarctic Coastline II

2014

Antarctica – the most extreme place on Earth!

Colder and windier than anywhere else on our planet, nothing has melted there in 40 million years; drier than anywhere else on Earth, though covered with 90% of Earth’s fresh water (as ice); the fifth largest continent on Earth has the highest average elevation as it is covered with 5,000 feet of ice.

Situated at the bottom of the Earth, beginning 500 miles south of the southern tip of South America, it spans the South Pole, where it is completely surrounded on all sides by some of Earth’s most treacherous oceans.

The only warm-blooded creatures that can live there year-round, are penguins, plus a few scientists.

As global warming continues, glaciers larger than small countries along both it’s southwestern and eastern edges, have now begun calving. not if, but when just half of this calving ice melts completely over the next 50 years, Earth’s sea level will rise more than 25 feet!

Uninhabitable as the Antarctic continent is, it is so very beautiful: white ice and snow covers the entire continent (except where the rock is so vertical that ice can not cling to it) against its backdrop of roiling oceans filled with thousands of smaller chunks of ice. When the weather is clear, the light is piercingly bright, casting long shadows against the surrounding ocean.

Antarctic Peninsula<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Aantarctic Peninsula II<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula III<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula IV<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula V<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula VI<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula VII<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula IX<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula X<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula XI<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014 Antarctic Peninsula XII<br>Antarctic Coastline II – 2014

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Albatrosses & Petrels

2014

The fossil records of both Albatrosses and Petrels go back nearly 60M years; both are pelagic, since they only return to land to breed. Dominant in the Southern Oceans, albatrosses and giant petrels are convergent, so while not closely related, they have independently evolved similar traits as a result of having to adapt to similar environments.

Albatrosses comprise a group of 22 species of large to very large birds, and are among the largest flying birds. Both albatrosses and petrels are tube-nosed seabirds with strong and sharp-edged bills, with their upper mandible terminating in a large hook. Along each side of their bill are tubes (long nostrils) that enable albatrosses and petrels to measure their exact airspeed during flight – analogous to the pilot tubes in modern aircraft – and thus are highly efficient in the air. With their ability to use dynamic soaring and slope soaring, they are able to cover great distances with minimal exertion.

In addition to wingspans of at least 8-10 feet, albatrosses’ wings are stiff and cambered, with thickened streamlined leading edges. They travel huge distances using two techniques common to any long-winged seabird: dynamic soaring and slope soaring. Dynamic soaring involves repeatedly rising into the wind and descending downwind, thus gaining energy from the vertical wind gradient, with effort only expended in turns at the top and bottom of each loop. This maneuver enables them to cover about 600 miles a day without flapping their wings. Slope soaring uses the rising air on the windward side of large waves. Albatrosses’ very high glide ratios of 22:1 means that they can travel forward a distance 22 times the drop. Further, they are aided in soaring by a shoulder-lock, a sheet of tendon that locks the wing when fully extended, allowing the wing to be outstretched without any muscle expenditure, a morphological adaptation they share with the giant petrels.

All albatrosses are listed to be at some level of endangerment as a result of the serious decline in fish stock, from overfishing, and from being hooked by longline fishing gear. Both feed on squid, fish and krill, by either scavenging, surface seizing, or diving.  And their breeding season can take over a year from laying to fledging with a single egg laid in each breeding attempt.

Combining their soaring techniques with their use of predictable weather systems, Albatrosses in the Southern Hemisphere flying north will take a clockwise route, while those flying south will fly counterclockwise. So well adapted to this lifestyle, their heart rates while flying are close to the basal heart rate when resting. Their flying intensity is such that the most energetically demanding aspect of a foraging trip is not the distance covered, but the landings, take-offs and hunting undertaken to find a food source.

Albatrosses live much longer than other birds; they delay breeding far longer and invest more effort into fewer young. Most species survive upwards of 50 years.

Capturing Albatrosses and Petrels in flight by camera, from a moving, bouncing ship in high seas is an exciting and exhausting challenge. With their habit of closely following ships for what might possibly be discharged, plus their natural tendency to glide within the ship’s draft, they definitely try to see just how close they can fly to the ship before having to veer off…

Petrel<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014 Albatross<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014 Petrel Il<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014 Albatross II<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014 Petrel III<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014 Albatross III<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014 Albatross and Petrel<br>Albatrosses & Petrels – 2014

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Two Critters Common in Antarctic Waters

2014

Fur Seals and Whales are widely distributed in the Southern Ocean within the Antarctic Convergence – the zone of water between the frigid waters of the true Antarctic and more temperate waters to the north. Most of the Fur Seal population breeds on South Georgia Island, and other nearby sub-Antarctic islands.

Fur Seals average 6-7 feet in length and weigh 200-250 pounds, and up to 400 lb. for the males. Their diet includes krill, squid and fish. The males tend to live about 15 years, while females live to 25 years on average. Antarctic Fur Seals are an example of seals that can walk on land, because of their ability to turn their rear flippers forward, converting them into useful “feet”.

Generally Fur Seals are a solo act outside of mating season although they will congregate in vast numbers on beaches near good feeding grounds in the autumn and early winter, often near penguin colonies. Breeding season begins in late October through December. Males fight extremely aggressively, with some encounters resulting in death, for the right to rule harems of up to 20 females (who wouldn’t?). Once they’ve established a harem, males are unwilling to leave them unprotected and will stay on land for up to 2 months without feeding. When the females arrive they are already pregnant from the previous year’s season, and give birth in November and December. The females mate about a week after giving birth. The pups are nursed by their mothers for about 4 months. Once they have learned to swim they usually stay at sea a number of years until they reach sexual maturity, at which point they return to land to join the others during the mating season.

Fur Seals’ natural predators are Sharks and Killer Whales, while the pups are vulnerable to Leopard Seals.

Whales most commonly found in the Southern Ocean are Humpback, Fin, with lesser numbers of Blue Whales. They are after the tremendous schools of high-protein krill.

Though I didn’t get to witness this, Orcas are known to hunt in packs, seeking out Fur Seals on small icebergs. Surrounding the iceberg, they repeatedly swim under it in unison, until the iceberg either tips, or breaks up as a result of the vibration created by the Orcas, at which point they grab the Fur Seal.

Fur Seals, when on shore, are readily visible; they often hang out near penguin colonies. Whales, on the other hand, are generally visible only at greater distances, or occasionally when they happen to surface very close.

Fur Seals and Penguins<br>Two Critters Common in Antarctic Waters – 2014 Young Fur Seal<br>Two Critters Common in Antarctic Waters – 2014 Young Fur Seal II<br>Two Critters Common in Antarctic Waters – 2014 Whale Tail<br>Two Critters Common in Antarctic Waters – 2014 Whale Tail II<br>Two Critters Common in Antarctic Waters – 2014

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My First Look at “The Ice Continent”

2014

Nothing has melted on Antarctica over the last 40 million years! The Earth’s fifth largest continent, including the South Pole, is its coldest, windiest, and driest continent. Since nothing melts on Antarctica, today it contains 90% of all of the Earth’s ice. Over these millions of years, the ice sheet has accumulated to more than a mile in height, making Antarctica the earth’s highest continent, with an average elevation greater than 5,000′.

Because of such minimal precipitation, however — only 2″ per year in the interior — Antarctica is considered desert. While its coastal regions receive 8″ of falling moisture annually, unlike most desert regions, frozen moisture can’t soak into the ground, so it too, adds to the ice sheet.

Stretching diagonally northwest-to-southeast nearly 2,000 miles across Antarctica, the Transantarctic Mountain Range (Mt. Kirpatrick, 14,856′ elev.) separates the continent’s east and west regions. Two thirds of Antarctica, lying east of this mountain range, is the size of Australia, while the western third includes a series of frozen islands comprising the Antarctic peninsula – which originally was a continuation of the Andes Mountain Range.

The ice sheets covering Antarctica slowly migrate: glaciers inch across the continent, cracking and breaking. As ice sheets crack along the coast, ice shelves and glaciers break off into the sea as icebergs.

Antarctic Islands<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Islands II<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Islands III<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Islands IV<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Islands V<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Islands VI<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Islands VII<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014 Antarctic Squall<br>My First Look at ‟The Ice Continent” - 2014

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Crossing Drake Passage

2014

Drake Passage is the 500 mile wide body of water separating South America’s southern tip, Cape Horn, from Antarctica. It connects the southwestern part of the Atlantic Ocean (Scotia Sea) to the southeastern part of the Pacific Ocean and extends into the Southern Ocean. Named for the 16th-century English privateer, Sir Francis Drake, whose last remaining ship, after having passed through the Straight of Magellan, was blown far south in 1578, revealing an open connection between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Chemical studies of fish teeth found in oceanic sedimentary rock confirm that Drake Passage was closed until about 40 million years ago. The separation of the two continents, created the Antarctic Circumpolar Current carrying a volume of water 600 times the flow of the Amazon River through Drake Passage, and around the Antarctic continent. And because this stretch of ocean circumvents the Earth without encountering any significant land masses, winds and waves can, and do build to incredible heights and force.

Before this passage opened some 40 million years ago, the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans were entirely separate, with Antarctica being much warmer and having no ice cap. The joining of these two great oceans created the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, cooling the Antarctic Continent significantly.

Since nothing has melted in Antarctica in millions of years, today the Antarctic continent contains 90% of the entire Earth’s ice.

Drake Passage<br>Crossing Drake Passage - 2013 Drake Passage II<br>Crossing Drake Passage - 2013 Drake Passage III<br>Crossing Drake Passage - 2013 Drake Passage IV<br>Crossing Drake Passage - 2013 Drake Passage V<br>Crossing Drake Passage - 2013 Drake Passage VI<br>Crossing Drake Passage - 2013

 

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Beagle Channel

2014

A year and a half ago, I spent two weeks along Antarctica’s northwest coast.

Flying to Buenos Aires and further south to Ushuaia, the ‘southernmost city in the world’ (Latitude 55 degrees S) which sits on the north bank of the Beagle Channel, the interior passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Named for Darwin’s ship that sailed this passage in 1831, the Beagle Channel separates Argentina’s very southern tip, the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, from Chile’s islands to the south.

Upon exiting the eastern end of Beagle Channel beyond Picton Island, Chile — a passage can then be set to cross the famed and feared 500 mile wide Drake Passage that separates South America from the ‘ice continent’.

Along the north side of Beagle Channel are lovely snow-covered mountains descending down to the water’s edge. Although this passage provides an inland route across Cape Horn, it is too narrow for sizeable ships to navigate its notoriously harsh and unpredictable weather.

Beagle Channel<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel II<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel III<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel IV<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel V<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel VI<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel VII<br>Beagle Channel - 2014 Beagle Channel VIII<br>Beagle Channel - 2014

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Inside Passage

2012

Arriving from Seattle, we flew into Sitka, Alaska in mid-August, about midpoint up the Alexander Archipelago that separates the mainland from the Pacific Ocean. Southeast Alaska’s 1,000 forested islands, 10,000 miles of shoreline, and 50+ major glaciers, have changed little in the past 1,000 years, except for the addition of slightly more than 70,000 residents. A temperate, hospitable land, the rain forest provides a cool environment most of the year. Transportation among the islands is still by water, though access to Alaska’s capitol in Juneau is essentially only by air.

Two days later we embarked on an 8-day cruise through the northern Inner Passage, aboard a 150′ vessel with 50 passengers plus crew. Exiting past the beautiful Mt. Edgecomb volcanic island, we rounded the northern end of Baranoff Island, then headed southeast out Peril Strait where we turned northeast up Chatham Strait.

It was so exciting to finally be cruising Alaska’s storied Inside Passage up to Glacier Bay!

Inside Passage<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Peril Straight<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Idaho Inlet<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Jonah<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Mount Fairweather<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Icy Straight<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Point Adolphus<br>Inside Passage - 2012 Mount Edgecombe<br>Inside Passage - 2012

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Kauai naPali Shore

2013

Kauai is the fourth largest of the main islands in the Hawaiian archipelago; it is also the oldest and most northern.  Just over one hundred miles across the Kauai Channel northwest of O’ahu, its 562 square miles has a population of 67,000.

From the spectacular Na Pali shoreline, along Kauai’s north end, looking in all directions is classic Kauai. Rarely without wind, the white surf rims the incredible blue ocean as its shoreline bends east and west.

Known as the “Garden Isle”, the Na Pali coast receives more rain than nearly any other place in the world. The contrast of its vivid greens interspersed with rust red earth and shadows from the usual voluminous cloud cover makes for one of the most stunning landscapes I’ve ever seen.

How can I resist overlaying all this with a vivid sense of the passage of time?

Highlands<br> Kauai naPali shore - 2013 Barking Beach<br> Kauai naPali shore - 2013 Sugar Cane<br> Kauai naPali shore - 2013 Southwest Coast<br> Kauai naPali shore - 2013 Sugar Cane II<br> Kauai naPali shore - 2013 West Coast<br> Kauai naPali shore - 2013

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Kauai Southwest Coast

2013

Like the other Hawaiian islands, Kauai is the top of an enormous volcano rising from the ocean floor. Kauai’s formation began nearly 6 million years ago as the Pacific plate passed over the Hawaii hotspot causing lava to begin to flow. The 5,243′ Kawaikini is the highest peak on this mountainous island. Near the center of this island is Kauai’s second highest peak, 5,148′ Wai’ale’ale; to its northeast, 460″ of annual rainfall has eroded deep valleys in the central mountains, carving out canyons with many incredibly scenic waterfalls.

Much of Kauai’s southwest coast is lined with high bluffs and cliffs, along with beaches, interspersed with fields of sugar cane and coffee plantations. Most of the island has bright red soil resulting from millions of years of weathering of the original black basalt that comprises most of the island. The incredible greens, contrasted against the island’s bright reds, marks its signature landscape.

Na Pali Coast<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013 Na Pali Coast II<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013 Volcanic Cliffs<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013 Volcanic Cliffs II<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013 Volcanic Cliffs III<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013 Na Pali Coast III<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013 Na Pali Coast Totem<br>Kauai Southwest Coast - 2013

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Kauai Na Pali Shore

2013

Kauai is the fourth largest of the main islands in the Hawaiian archipelago; it is also the oldest and most northern. Just over one hundred miles across the Kauai Channel northwest of O’ahu, its 562 square miles has a population of 67,000.

From the spectacular Na Pali shoreline, along Kauai’s north end, looking in all directions is classic Kauai. Rarely without wind, the white surf rims the incredible blue ocean as its shoreline bends east and west.

Known as the “Garden Isle”, the Na Pali coast receives more rain than nearly any other place in the world. The contrast of its vivid greens interspersed with rust red earth and shadows from the usual voluminous cloud cover makes for one of the most stunning landscapes I’ve ever seen.

How can I resist overlaying all this with a vivid sense of the passage of time?

Na Pali Shoreline<br>Kawai Na Pali Shore - 2013 East Shoreline<br>Kawai Na Pali Shore - 2013 East Shoreline II<br>Kawai Na Pali Shore - 2013 East Shoreline III<br>Kawai Na Pali Shore - 2013 East Shoreline IV<br>Kawai Na Pali Shore - 2013

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Motion Strokes

My first attempts at infusing the feeling of motion into my photographic images originated with my shooting moving objects – cars, trains, people walking or running. (more…)

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Seascapes VII

2007

Pacific NW Coast III

This is my third series captured during my 2010 roadtrip along the northern California and Oregon coasts. Though rarely blessed with optimal light, I was able to take the time for moments of sun to break through. From the cliffs along the Lost Coast in northern California, to the many rivers flowing into the Pacific, to the wonderfully wide and empty Oregon beaches, to tidal Netarts Bay just north of Cape Lookout contained by a five-mile stretch of beach, the Pacific NW coast is rugged and varied.

The south-flowing Pacific current along the NW coast and the weather, both constantly in motion, offer the perfect foil for overlaying my images with a sense of the passage of time.

Lost Coast<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007 Tidal Composition<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007 Tide Pool<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007 Beach Containing Neetarts Bay<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007 Neetarts Bay<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007 Neetarts Bay II<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007 Seaweed Composition<br>Seascapes VII: Pacific NW Coast III - 2007

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Seascapes VI

2007

Pacific NW Coast II

Sea stacks — offshore monoliths, also known as haystack rocks — are either the result of portions of headlands splintering off, or from under sea lava flows, or from lava flowing into the sea. Cooling lava became hardened basalt over time; this heavy basalt remained buried under marine sediments for millions of years. As the climate shifted and the sea level receded, the rocks were revealed be either attached to the shoreline or off shore. Their dark shadows cast on the water further accentuate their interesting shapes.

Primarily images of haystacks, I captured this series along the Oregon coast under varied lighting conditions that invariably depended on the degree of cloud cover.

Haystack Cove<br>Seascapes VI: Pacific NW Coast II - 2007 Haystack Cove II<br>Seascapes VI: Pacific NW Coast II - 2007 Coastline<br>Seascapes VI: Pacific NW Coast II - 2007 Cliff Totem<br>Seascapes VI: Pacific NW Coast II - 2007 Haystack Cove III<br>Seascapes VI: Pacific NW Coast II - 2007

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Seascapes V

2007

Pacific NW coast

In 2010 I made an extensive roadtrip beginning south of the California-Oregon border traveling north along the rugged and beautiful Pacific NW coast to Astoria, overlooking the Columbia River and the Washington border.

Along this coast are intermittent capes protruding into the Pacific that offer expansive cliff views, interspersed with stretches of very wide beaches, sand dunes, and hundreds of haystacks just offshore, plus the many rivers draining the Coastal mountains, this nearly 500 mile stretch of the northwest coast is simply breathtaking. This series plus the next two comprise my October “capture” of this stretch of the Pacific Northwest coast.

Coast Composition<br>Seascapes V: Pacific NW coast - 2007 Coast Composition II<br>Seascapes V: Pacific NW coast - 2007 Coast Composition III<br>Seascapes V: Pacific NW coast - 2007 Haystack<br>Seascapes V: Pacific NW coast - 2007 Haystack II<br>Seascapes V: Pacific NW coast - 2007 Haystack III<br>Seascapes V: Pacific NW coast - 2007

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Seascapes IV

2007

Tomales Bay

Tomales Bay, a 15 mile long by mile wide inlet of the Pacific Ocean, separates Point Reyes Peninsula from the Marin County mainland, 30 miles north of San Francisco. The bay forms the eastern boundary of Point Reyes National Seashore and lies along a submerged portion of the San Andreas Fault.

On its northern end, Tomales Bay opens out onto Bodega Bay, which shelters it from the direct current of the Pacific.

Nestled between the Marin hills to the east and the Point Reyes Peninsula’s rolling hills to the west, this tranquil bay offers lovely views of the edges of these two land masses.

East Shore<br>Seascapes IV: Tomales Bay - 2007 South End<br>Seascapes IV: Tomales Bay - 2007 South End II<br>Seascapes IV: Tomales Bay - 2007 West Shore<br>Seascapes IV: Tomales Bay - 2007 West Shore II<br>Seascapes IV: Tomales Bay - 2007

 

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Seascapes III

2007

Drakes Bay

Thirty miles north of San Francisco, southwest facing Drakes Bay is situated on the lee side of the southern coastal current of Point Reyes Peninsula. Long considered Drake’s most likely landing spot on North America’s west cost during his 1579 world circumnavigation,

Drakes Bay is backed by dramatic white sandstone cliffs that were created 10-13 million years ago. Erosion has revealed the striations of this story in the cliff faces.

The constant pounding of the Pacific combined with the magnificent 8-mile curved Bay’s tempestuous weather emphasizes the incessant passage of time.

Drakes Bay<br>Seascapes III: Drakes Bay - 2007 Low Tide<br>Seascapes III: Drakes Bay - 2007 In Flight<br>Seascapes III: Drakes Bay - 2007 Tide’s In<br>Seascapes III: Drakes Bay - 2007 Tide’s In II<br>Seascapes III: Drakes Bay - 2007 Spring<br>Seascapes III: Drakes Bay - 2007

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Golden Gate V

2007

Containers In, Containers Out

San Francisco’s Golden Gate shipway has a depth of 300’ plus 220’ of bridge clearance allowing the famous Bay entrance access to all forms of commercial shipping. Most prevalent are the container ships plying the Asian-North American markets. Piled high, these ships are spectacular behemoths in size, mass and color, and their graceful, quiet passage provides a visual foil that equals the narrows’ tides and weather and the magnificent Bridge above.

Containers Under Golden Gate<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Containers Out<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Containers Out II<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Evergreen's Containers<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Little Tug That Could!<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Hanjin Containers Out II<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Containers In<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007 Asian Bound Containers Empty<br>Golden Gate V: Containers In, Containers Out - 2007

 

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Golden Gate IV

2007

The Bridge

In 1916, a bridge connecting San Francisco to Marin was first seriously considered. Seventeen years later after extensive design and engineering editions, political maneuvering and WWI interruptions, construction finally began. In 1937 the majestic Golden Gate Bridge was completed.

Truly a masterpiece in every sense, the Golden Gate Bridge became the grandest of functional art. Painted orange vermillion to compliment its natural surroundings while still appearing as visible to ships as possible, its aesthetic design is equal to its superior engineering. Who isn’t enamored with its iconic grace?

The Bridge<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007 Elegance<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007 Elegant Profile<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007 Rounding North<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007 Elegance II<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007 Reflections<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007 North to Marin<br>Golden Gate IV: The Bridge - 2007

 

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Golden Gate III

2007

San Francisco Coastline

Stretching south from the Golden Gate Bridge, the houses high along Presidio Cliffs gradually descend to Baker Beach and Pt. Lobos beyond, creating spectacular views along this idyllic portion of the San Francisco coastline. The panorama includes the Bridge, Marin Headlands, the ship traffic, the ocean, and on very clear days the Farallon Islands, 27 miles west.

Churning that coastline is the continuous suction of the sea followed by its mad rushes at the mile-wide gate. And the weather is almost always either pushing or pulling, with or against tides. My challenge is to portray that force.

San Francisco Coastline<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 Ebb Tide<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 FloodTide<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 Baker Beach<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 Pacific Beyond II<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 Sea Cliffs<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 Sea Cliffs II<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007 Point Lobos<br>Golden Gate III: San Francisco Coastline - 2007

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