Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II

2017

The Adriatic Sea, roughly 100 miles wide, begins at the Mediterranean Sea and runs northwest about 800 miles to where Italy, Slovenia and Croatia come together at its northern terminus, while The Adriatic Sea separates Italy from the eastern Balkan Peninsula for its entire length.

Along the eastern side of the Adriatic Sea, the eastern Balkan Peninsula (North-to-South), includes Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, and Greece. Beginning at Croatia’s north end, the Dalmatian Coast extends south-southeast.

The Dalmation Coast’s high limestone elevations offer wonderful views of its own coast line, its many just off-shore islands, tropical Mediterranean weather and sea, as well as occasional glimpses of Italy’s distant coast.

Dalmatian Coast<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II— 2017 Dalmatian Coast II<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II— 2017 Dalmatian Coast III<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II— 2017 Dalmatian Coast IV<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II— 2017 Dalmatian Coast V<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II— 2017 Dalmatian Coast VI<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast II— 2017

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Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I

2017

The Adriatic Sea, roughly 100 miles wide, begins at the Mediterranean Sea and runs northwest about 800 miles to where Italy, Slovenia and Croatia come together at its northern terminus. The Adriatic Sea separates Italy from the eastern Balkan Peninsula for its entire length.

Along the eastern side of the Adriatic Sea, the eastern Balkan Peninsula (North-to-South), includes Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, and Greece.

From its northern end, at Slovenia, Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast extends south-southeast, opposite Italy, all the way southeast to just beyond Dubrovnik, at its border with Montenegro.

The Dalmatian Coast’s strong Italian influence stretches back to Italy’s occupation of the Coast by the Romans in 12 AD, which lasted, off and on, for nearly 400 years.

Dalmatian Coast<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I — 2017 Dalmatian Coast II<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I — 2017 Dalmatian Coast III<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I — 2017 Dalmatian Coast IV<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I — 2017 Dalmatian Coast V<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I — 2017 Dalmatian Coast VI<br>Eastern European Naratives: Dalmatian Coast I — 2017

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Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III

2017

An Alive Mountain. One of the more compelling landscapes I’ve encountered.

I must return to make more images.

Plitvise-C<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III — 2017 Plitvise-C II<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III — 2017 Plitvise-C III<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III — 2017 Plitvise-C IV<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III — 2017 Plitvise-C V<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III — 2017 Plitvise-C VI<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise III — 2017

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Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II

2017

A Visual Feast of An Alive Mountain

Water constantly bubbling up out of the ground — everywhere — then rushing down the mountain, forming hundreds of waterfalls throughout the surrounding forest’s beautiful autumn colors.  All of this being the result of complex underground karstic limestone dissolution occurring since the end of the last ice age 12,000 to 15,000 years ago.

How then, to capture this unceasing bubbling motion against the otherwise still mountain?

Plitvise-B<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II — 2017 Plitvise-B II<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II — 2017 Plitvice-B III<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II — 2017 Plitvise-B IV<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II — 2017 Plitvise-B V<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II — 2017 Plitvise-B VI<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise II — 2017

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Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I

2017

Founded in 1949, Croatia’s Plitvice Lakes National Park, at its border with Bosnia and Herzegovina, is about 40 miles east of the Adriatic coast. One of the oldest and the largest national park in Croatia, Plitvice Lakes was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register in 1979.

The Plitvice Lakes were formed in a depression between Mala Kapela mountain to the west and the Plitesevica mountain to the east, within the Dinaric Alps. Its 16 lakes, visible from the surface are grouped into 12 upper, four lower lakes.

Between a narrow opening in the mountains to the south, and the Korona River exiting to the north, through a steep and narrow draw that accommodates the entire 3,000′ altitude differential within the park.

The underground configuration of the Plitvice Lakes consists of geologic features attributed to the southeast European Karsk of brittle porous limestone, which allows rivers to drain away through the rock to create extensive underground river systems, and caves. Upon reaching hard rock, rivers emerge on the surface. The phenomenon of underground karst rivers, observed at Plitvice Lakes, are the result of century-old processes of sedimentation of chalk, which is abundantly available in the waters of this karst area.

Geologically, the phenomena molding the Plitvice Lakes is quite young. According to radiocarbon datings, the complex processes of dissolution and sedimentation of limestone require specific climatic preconditions, which have only existed since the end of the ice age 12,000 to 15,000 years ago.

Plitvice National Park is spectacular! Constantly flowing waters bubbling up and out of the ground everywhere, then flowing downward steeply, causing hundreds of waterfalls – all against the beautiful mountain sky, striking autumn colors, and awesome light. What a visual feast!

Plitvise-A<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I — 2017 Plitvise-A II<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I — 2017 Plitvise-A III<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I — 2017 Plitvise-A IV<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I — 2017 Plitvise-A V<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I — 2017 Plitvise-A VI<br>Eastern European Narratives: Plitvise I — 2017

 

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The Dazzling Lights along Budapest’s Danube

2017

As the sun sets, Budapest’s Danube waterfront comes alive. Lights along its vast collection of memorial buildings and bridges announce and enhance this beautiful city’s main thoroughfare…

Budapest Lights<br>Budapest II — 2017 Budapest Lights II<br>Budapest II — 2017 Budapest Lights III<br>Budapest II — 2017 Budapest Lights IV<br>Budapest II — 2017 Budapest Lights V<br>Budapest II — 2017 Budapest Lights VI<br>Budapest II — 2017

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Eastern European Narratives: Budapest

2017

Pest-Buda became a global city with the unification of Buda, Obuda, and Pest in 1873, with the name “Budapest” given to the new capital. Budapest also became the co-capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, a great power that dissolved in 1918, following WWI.

Upon entering Budapest from the south is the Statue of Liberty perched on top of Gellert Hill. First erected in 1947 in remembrance of the Soviet liberation of Hungary from Nazi forces during WWII, the 14 meter tall bronze statue stands atop a 26 meter pedestal holding a palm leaf.

Views of Budapest, overlooking the Danube River which runs North-South, separating what was once known as Pest along the west side of the Danube, and Buda, on the east side of the Danube. The hills on both sides of the Danube provide wonderful panoramics of the city. The Danube, located in Central and Eastern Europe, is Europe’s Second longest river after the Volga.

The House of Houdini memorializes Harry Houdini’s 1874 birth in Budapest. Upon immigrating to the U.S., he became a famous illusionist, known especially for his sensational escape artistry.

Budapest: Statue of Liberty<br>Eastern European Narratives: Budapest — 2017 Budapest II<br>Eastern European Narratives: Budapest — 2017 Budapest III<br>Eastern European Narratives: Budapest — 2017 Budapest IV<br>Eastern European Narratives: Budapest — 2017 Budapest V: House of Houdini<br>Eastern European Narratives: Budapest — 2017

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Eastern European Narratives: Bucharest

2017

From Venice we flew east to Bucharest to begin our 10 day Blue Danube River Cruise, west and then north to Budapest.

Bucharest, Romania’s capital and largest city, is situated in the southeast corner of the country, just north of the Danube River and the Bulgarian border. Between the two World Wars, Bucharest’s elegant architecture and the sophistication of its elite earned it the nickname of “Little Paris”.

Buildings and districts in the historic city center were heavily damaged or destroyed by war, earthquakes, but above all, by Nicholae Ceausescu’s 1965-1989 implementation of communist systemization. Today, Bucharest’s 2.4 million population makes it the seventh-largest city in the European Union.

Economically, Bucharest is the most prosperous city in Romania, and is one of the main industrial centers and transportation hubs of eastern and Central Europe.

Bucharest: Communist Tumor Skewered, 1989<br>Bucharest — 2017 Bucharest II: Cathedral dome<br>Bucharest — 2017 Bucharest III: George Enescu (1881-1955), Romania’s gifted violinist, pianist and composer<br>Bucharest — 2017 Bucharest IV: street art<br>Bucharest — 2017 Bucharest V: Statue of Iuliu Manin, Romania’s Prime Minister, 1928-1933<br>Bucharest — 2017

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Eastern Europe Narratives: Venice 2

2017

Continuing our wandering along Venice’s wonderful waterfronts…

Venice 2<br>Eastern Europe Narratives: Venice 2 — 2017 Venice 2 II<br>Eastern Europe Narratives: Venice 2 — 2017 Venice 2 III<br>Eastern Europe Narratives: Venice 2 — 2017 Venice 2 IV<br>Eastern Europe Narratives: Venice 2 — 2017 Venice 2 V<br>Eastern Europe Narratives: Venice 2 — 2017

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